Michael Dean, Analogue Series (Neck) (2011)
       
     
Michael Dean, Analogue Series (Neck) (2011)
       
     
Michael Dean, Analogue Series (Neck) (2011)

Ilaria Gianni and Cecilia Canziani write about this artwork, “it’s a dialogue between voices that confront concepts of permanence and temporariness, history and immanence, physical correspondences and emotional intermissions. In response to the stratifications that visually return the passing of history in the city of Rome, the artist centers his reflection on the element of the column in his materiality and immateriality, tangible and intangible memory. The column represents the material history of immanence and duration: stone transformed in a supporting structure with the time that returns stone. The form, submitted to a further transformation in correspondence of our physical presence relates to the neck, through and subsequently the notion of voice”. The sculpted neck is the mean to connect the humanm hic et nunc to the dialogue written on the pages of a book scattered around the city “the throat descrives this...returns your caresses”, a monotonous tune sublime like the jewish shir ha-shirim. It is the research of hidden and inexpressed sense, of the relation with the material and immaterial reality that we continually destroy and rebuild. 

Keyword: shir ha-shirim

The shir ha-shirim, or Chant of Solomon, sinks its roots in the literary production that flourishes in Egypt during the New Reing (1550-1069 BCE). The love poem style and the love lyrics are conserved in a series of collections preserved on papyrus and ostraka. The title of the compositions are eloquent and they talk about the intimate relation between two lovers: Start of the words of great joy of the heart, Three wishes, The power of love, Wishes of love. The authors of the biblical text perfectly know the lyrical Egyptian tradition: the lexicon, the style, the rhythm inspire the Jewish chant that will be declined like the metaphor of the love relationship between god and its peoples. 

Bibliography

On the interpretations of the shir ha-shirim, see Giuseppe Ricciotti, Cantico dei cantici,www.treccani.it 

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